Go Ask Your Father: Moonwalk, Tides, Earthquakes, and Hot Light Bulbs

I’ve had a guitar for 14 years. Guess how many complete songs I can play…

If you guessed one, your guess is too high. I can read basic music thanks to my years of playing trumpet in elementary and some middle school. I like the guitar because of it’s portability. I had a violin for a bit, too. I didn’t learn anything that because, well, it sucked. I know it’s the poor craftsman who blames his tools, but a music friend of my parents played it and said it wasn’t worth the wood it was built. Lately, though, I’ve come to really enjoy listening to the piano. I was substituting in a music class yesterday and girl played the chorus of Believer by Imagine Dragons and it was really neat to hear. That got me hooked so I found a YouTuber, a 14 year old named Sarah who played an incredible version of it. Even my boys loved it.

I can play the piano. With one hand behind my back (because I don’t use it anyway). I play all the classics… Mary had a Little Lamb, Frere Jacques, Twinkle Twinkle Little Star.

1. What’s a moonwalk?

Of course, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin and their 10 friends who have actually been to the moon (no, it’s not a conspiracy… Buzz punched a guy who thought it was therefore it is not). The real moonwalk was done 240,000 miles closer to home. It was right here on our planet Earth to be precise. The earliest recorded instance of the famed dance move is by Cab Calloway in 1932. They called it “The Buzz” 37 years before Buzz did his moonwalk. It was performed by many throughout the years by such stars as Judy Garland, Dick Van Dyke, and James Brown. It gained it’s infamy when Michael Jackson performed it during his televised event, Motown 25: Yesterday, Today, Forever where it became his signature move. It’s a move in which the dancer moves backwards but appears to be walking forward. There are Youtube videos that teach you how to do it.

2. What are tides?

They’re not the orange jugs of laundry soap. They’re not the pods that you need to keep locked and stored out of reach of kids who think the colorful bauble of soap might be candy. The Earth’s tides have to do with water, but not the cold water washing machine cycle. The tides are the ebb and flow, the movement of the water onto and away from the shoreline. Like that morning we went to the beach and the water was really close to us, but after lunch it was far away from our blanket and umbrella. We can thank the moon for that. The moon’s gravity pulls at the oceans of the Earth like little brothers pull big sister’s hair.

The moon’s gravity pulls at the Earth and the oceans’ water is able to move significantly as result. The water is pulled toward the moon. The gravity of the moon also makes the Earth wobble just a bit. Imagine the water moving UP the side of a glass that you are moving in a circle on the kitchen table. That up water in the glass would correlate with high tide on the Earth. As the moon orbits the Earth the oceans facing the sun are also pulled toward it. Simultaneously, the pull of the moon and slosh created by the wobble are on opposite sides of the Earth. As the Earth rotates through those two points the tides rise and fall.

3. Do we get earthquakes here?

Nope. Thankfully. Mexico is still cleaning up their mess. I’m not sure Haiti and Nepal have fully recovered, either. You see, here in Atlantic Canada we don’t live near any fault lines. Fault lines are where techtonic plates of different continental masses rub together. We are on that little land mass just above the i in Carribbean. A couple years ago a small quake was detected about 400 miles off shore of Newfoundland. We didn’t feel a thing and I never heard about any tidal surges because of it. Looking at the fault lines it’s not hard to imagine why New Zealand and California, among other places that lie on the fault lines, are always shaken (and not stirred).

4. Why do some lights get hot and others don’t?

Have you ever touched an incandescent bulb after it has been on for a bit? It’s a lesson you learn real quick. If you’re a man you’re going to try to be tough through the pain so you can get that bulb changed. If you’re a woman you’ll have the sense to use oven mitts or just wait for it to cool off. In an incandescent bulb, a filament acts as a resistor and heats up. It gets to about 4,600 degrees Farenheit to be exact. For comparison, lava is only 2,200 degrees F. This high heat creates some visible light. 90% of an incandescent bulb is heat and 5% is infered light. The other 5% is visible light. I highly suggest you switch to LED lights. Less electricity, less heat, same amount of light.

If you want to light up my life head over to Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram and follow me…

11 thoughts on “Go Ask Your Father: Moonwalk, Tides, Earthquakes, and Hot Light Bulbs

  1. I own a guitar too. I can play simple songs on it self taught. Have since given it to my son. He has been having lessons for years now. I love men who can play the guitar. Had a huge crush of my friend’s brother 😍
    Both of my girls play the piano. The youngest play the violin as well. The oldest played trombone by default since her school needed a player.

    Like

    • Very nice. You have a musical family! After hearing kids play the paino and then seeing that girl on YouTube I kinda really wish I could play the piano. Guess I should just practice my guitar for more than 5 minutes a week.

      Liked by 1 person

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